Social Awareness

Social Awareness

0.25 USBE Credits
Social awareness skills are essential components of social and emotional learning. Adults who practice and model social awareness skills are more effectively able to support students in developing these skills. Social awareness is the ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others, including those from diverse backgrounds and cultures, as well as understanding social and ethical norms for behavior, and to recognize family, school, and community resources and supports.

DESCRIPTION

To earn this 0.25 credit badge you will submit one type of evidence from the list below to demonstrate your social awareness. You will also complete a short written or video reflective analysis. Click Earn This Badge to learn more!

FEES

You will be charged $20 by the badge provider. You'll be charged at the point you submit your badge for final review.

CLARIFICATIONS

Social Awareness includes all of the following:
• Perspective-taking
• Empathy
• Appreciating diversity
• Respect for others

IMPORTANT TERMS

Social Awareness: The ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others, including those from diverse backgrounds and cultures. The ability to understand social and ethical norms for behavior and to recognize family, school, and community resources and supports.

BACKGROUND SCENARIO

Mr. Lin knows that social awareness skills are crucial for the students in his 10th grade English language arts class to have a successful high school experience and to become responsible, well integrated citizens of the community, the country, and the world.

To that end, he builds regular experiences into his coursework that help students to take others’ perspectives and empathize, appreciate all types of diversity, and recognize community resources. Some of these experiences include:
• Discussing characters in literature and history, how they felt, and why they took certain actions
• Organizing project-based learning that explores different cultures, regions, and time periods
• Using cooperative learning and project-based learning to build diverse working groups
• Inviting community leaders and helpers to visit the classroom

EVIDENCE OPTIONS

Video: Submit a short (3-5 minute) video of your participation in a community organization. Be sure to identify yourself in the video or in a separate document. This organization should be one that supports broader, positive community outcomes. Examples include organizations that support community resources around any of the following:
• Youth Groups
• Service/Governance
• Advocacy/Social Justice
• Athletics/Outdoors/Environment
• Arts/Music
• Historical/Cultural
• Spiritual/Religious
• Other
Be sure to identify yourself in the video or in a separate document. This evidence should demonstrate your effective and consistent social awareness.


Testimonial: Submit a testimonial from a leader or member of a community organization about your membership in or support of that organization. This organization should be one that supports broader, positive community outcomes. Examples include organizations that support community resources around any of the following:
• Youth Groups
• Service/Governance
• Advocacy/Social Justice
• Athletics/Outdoors/Environment
• Arts/Music
• Historical/Cultural
• Spiritual/Religious
• Other
This evidence should demonstrate your effective and consistent social awareness.


Observation Results: Submit observation results from an individual who has witnessed your participation in a community organization. This organization should be one that supports broader, positive community outcomes. Examples include organizations that support community resources around any of the following:
• Youth Groups
• Service/Governance
• Advocacy/Social Justice
• Athletics/Outdoors/Environment
• Arts/Music
• Historical/Cultural
• Spiritual/Religious
• Other
This evidence should demonstrate your effective and consistent social awareness.



Other: Submit evidence of your attendance at a cultural event from a culture not your own. Examples include:
Food festival
Musical performance
Dance performance
Visual arts exhibition
Include a written or video statement describing the impact of this cultural event. This evidence should demonstrate your social awareness.

Candidate's Choice: Submit another type of evidence demonstrating your effective and consistent social awareness.

Candidates are required to make evidence submission(s).

Review Criteria

Criterion 1: Evidence demonstrates the educator is motivated to act for the common good.

Criterion 2: Evidence demonstrates the educator works collaboratively to achieve positive outcomes.

Criterion 3: Evidence demonstrates the educator recognizes and supports community resources.

REFLECTION PROMPTS

  1. How does the ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others impact your role as an educator? Give an example.

  2. Explain how all types of diversity in the classroom leads to a more effective educational experience for learners.

  3. Describe how your involvement in the community impacts your role as an educator.

Review Criteria

Criterion 1: Reflection demonstrates the ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others.

Criterion 2: Reflection demonstrates a respect for and appreciation of diversity.

Criterion 3: Reflection demonstrates recognition of the value of community resources.

RESOURCES

CASEL: Core SEL Competencies
https://casel.org/core-competencies/
Social and emotional learning (SEL) enhances students’ capacity to integrate skills, attitudes, and behaviors to deal effectively and ethically with daily tasks and challenges. Like many similar frameworks, CASEL’s integrated framework promotes intrapersonal, interpersonal, and cognitive competence. There are five core competencies that can be taught in many ways across many settings. Many educators and researchers are also exploring how best to assess these competencies.

Choosing Civility: The 25 Rules of Considerate Conduct
Find it on Amazon.com
Most people would agree that thoughtful behavior and common decency are in short supply, or simply forgotten in hurried lives of emails, cellphones, and multi-tasking. In Choosing Civility, P. M. Forni identifies the twenty-five rules that are most essential in connecting effectively and happily with others.

Inclusive Teaching Resources: Build a Community of Learners
http://rmit.libguides.com/c.php?g=336381&p=2262670
This website provides structures and strategies, including technology, to facilitate cooperative learning for knowledge building

Social Skills for Kids: Over 75 Fun Games & Activities for Building Better Relationships, Problem Solving & Improving Communication, by Janine Halloran (2018)
Find it on Amazon.com
The author shares the best play experiences for kids to learn and practice social skills in real places and situations. This rich resource includes reproducible, step-by-step plans for how to play, alternatives to each activity, and debriefing questions to reinforce learning.

Teaching Social Skills to Youth, 3rd Ed.: An Easy-To-Follow Guide to Teaching 183 Basic to Complex Life Skills; by Jeff Tierney M.Ed. (2016)
Find it on Amazon.com
An Easy-to-Follow Guide to Teaching 183 Basic to Complex Life Skills Teaching Social Skills to Youth is Boys Town s trademark manual, offering the step-by-step component behaviors to 183 skills. The skills range from basic to complex and have been updated to reflect the challenges today s youth face. This third edition still includes hallmark treatment examples, demonstrating how and when to teach the skills. But new insights and information, based on the latest research findings, have been added. Also added are details about multi tiered approaches to social and emotional learning, and how skills relate to executive function. The appendices highlight what skills to include when you want to focus on social and emotional competency, executive function processes, behavior problems and problem situations. An enclosed CD offers printable posters for each skill.

The Inclusive Class: 10 Ways to Teach Social Skills in Your Classroom
http://www.theinclusiveclass.com/2015/08/10-ways-to-teach-social-skills-in-your.html
Teach social skills in your classroom by modeling manners. If you expect your students to learn and display good social skills, then you need to lead by example.

You are a Social Detective: Explaining Social Thinking to Kids. San Jose, CA: Think Social Publishing, Inc. by: Michelle Garcia Winner, Pamela Crooke, Kelly Knopp
Find it on Amazon.com
This book helps explain the relationship between our behaviors and others' thoughts about us.

BADGE EARNERS

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