Relationship Skills

Relationship Skills

0.25 USBE Credits
This microcredential represents the relationship skills that are essential components of social and emotional learning. Adults who practice and model healthy relationship skills are more effectively able to support students in developing these skills. These skills include the ability to establish and maintain healthy and rewarding relationships with diverse individuals and groups.

DESCRIPTION

To earn this 0.25 credit microcredential you will submit one type of evidence from the list below to demonstrate your effective use of relationship skills. You will also complete a written or video reflective analysis. Click Earn This Microcredential to learn more!

FEES

You will be charged $20 by the badge provider. You'll be charged at the point you submit your badge for final review.

CLARIFICATIONS

Elements of relationship skills include the following:
• Communication
• Social engagement
• Relationship-building
• Teamwork

IMPORTANT TERMS

Relationship Skills: The ability to establish and maintain healthy and rewarding relationships with diverse individuals and groups. The ability to communicate clearly, listen well, cooperate with others, resist inappropriate social pressure, negotiate conflict constructively, and seek and offer help when needed.

BACKGROUND SCENARIO

Mr. Jones, middle school math teacher, values cooperative learning as a part of his instruction. He has seen how social interaction helps students to understand and use the concepts he teaches. However, his current group of students in third period have struggled to work cohesively during cooperative learner experiences. He realizes that he needs to support these learners with relationship skills.

Mr. Jones begins inserting short (3 minute) mini-lessons at the beginning of each class on relationship skills, which he revisits before cooperative learning activities and during the last 30 seconds of class. These mini-lessons include the following topics:
Introducing yourself
Starting a conversation
resolving conflicts
Giving and receiving constructive feedback
Asking for and offering help

As his students practice these skills during both his mini-lessons and during cooperative learning lessons, they begin to be able to focus on learning mathematical concepts, rather than being distracted by social friction.

EVIDENCE OPTIONS

Video: Submit a short (5-8 minute) video of your participation on a professional team (grade level, content area, PLC, etc.) or committee. Be sure to identify yourself in the video or in an attached document. This video should demonstrate your effective and consistent use of relationship skills to support effective, professional teamwork.

Survey Results: Survey the members of a team of which you are a member or committee on which you serve. Submit the survey and its results. This should be a survey of your design, which covers your relationship skills—specifically your skills relating to teamwork. Include a written reflection about the survey results. The survey results should demonstrate your effective and consistent use of relationship skills to support teamwork.

Testimonial: Submit testimonials from two colleagues in which they attest to your professional relationship skills. These testimonials should demonstrate your effective and consistent use of practices that support healthy working relationships, including each of the following:
Communication
Social Engagement
Relationship Building
Teamwork
These testimonials may be submitted in written or video form.


Other: Submit 4-6 written messages (emails, memos, letters, etc.) you have sent to your colleagues as a part of your professional work. These messages should demonstrate your ability to communicate in a way that builds professional relationships and fosters productive teamwork.

Other: Submit a written or video-recorded description of a time when you effectively used conflict-resolution skills to address a situation which involved a disagreement with a colleague. This description should demonstrate your effective use of relationship skills.

Candidate's Choice: Submit another type of evidence demonstrating your effective and consistent use of relationship skills to maintain healthy and productive professional relationships.

Candidates are required to make 1 evidence submission(s).

Review Criteria

Criterion 1: Evidence demonstrates the educator’s ability to establish and maintain healthy professional relationships.

Criterion 2: Evidence demonstrates the educator’s ability to communicate clearly.

Criterion 3: Evidence demonstrates the educator’s ability to negotiate conflict constructively.

REFLECTION PROMPTS

  1. Describe how your ability to establish and maintain healthy professional relationships with colleagues impacts your effectiveness as an educator. What role does clear communication play in this?

  2. Explain how you handle conflicts with colleagues. Give an example of how you negotiated through a conflict to achieve constructive results.

  3. What are your strengths in the area of relationship skills? What are your weaknesses? What steps can you take to become more effective in this area?

Review Criteria

Criterion 1: Reflection demonstrates the educator’s ability to establish and maintain healthy professional relationships.

Criterion 2: Reflection demonstrates the educator’s ability to communicate clearly.

Criterion 3: Reflection demonstrates the educator’s ability to negotiate conflict constructively.

RESOURCES

19 Children's Books that Teach Social Skills
https://www.teachstarter.com/blog/19-childrens-books-classroom-activities-teach-social-skills/
TeachStarter Blog Post: 19 picture books are highlighted along with activities for each book.

A Bad Case of Tattle Tongue. Cook, Julia. (2005).
Find it on Amazon.com
A Bad Case of Tattle Tongue is a picture book that gives teachers and counselors a humorous, cleverly creative way to address the time-consuming tattling-related issues that often sap classroom energy and thwart teaching opportunities. Every adult that desires to help children understand the differences between unnecessary tattling and the necessity of warning others about important matters needs this book! (Ages 5-8)

Activities for Building Character and Social-Emotional Learning Grades 1–2, by Katia S. Petersen, Ph.D (2012)
Find it on Amazon.com
Build attitudes of respect and caring, reduce problem behaviors, empower students to solve problems, and educate the whole child with this flexible, user-friendly activity guide. The lessons' literature-based connections allow teachers to "build in" rather than "add on" social-emotional learning (SEL) throughout the day. Field-tested in classrooms across the United States, these activities when fully implemented have resulted in improved school climate, greater parent engagement, increased academic achievement, and reduction in discipline referrals.

Activities for Building Character and Social-Emotional Learning Grades 3-5, by Katia S. Petersen, Ph.D. (2012)
Find it on Amazon.com
Build attitudes of respect and caring, reduce problem behaviors, empower students to solve problems, and educate the whole child with this flexible, user-friendly activity guide. The lessons' literature-based connections allow teachers to "build in" rather than "add on" social-emotional learning (SEL) throughout the day. Field-tested in classrooms across the United States, these activities when fully implemented have resulted in improved school climate, greater parent engagement, increased academic achievement, and reduction in discipline referrals.

Activities for Building Character and Social-Emotional Learning Grades 6-8 by Katia S. Petersen Ph.D (2012)
Find it on Amazon.com
Build attitudes of respect and caring, reduce problem behaviors, empower students to solve problems, and educate the whole child with this flexible, user-friendly activity guide. The lessons' literature-based connections allow teachers to "build in" rather than "add on" social-emotional learning (SEL) throughout the day. Field-tested in classrooms across the United States, these activities when fully implemented have resulted in improved school climate, greater parent engagement, increased academic achievement, and reduction in discipline referrals.

Activities for Building Character and Social-Emotional Learning Grades PreK-K, by Katia S. Petersen Ph.D (2012)
Find it on Amazon.com
Build attitudes of respect and caring, reduce problem behaviors, empower students to solve problems, and educate the whole child with this flexible, user-friendly activity guide. The lessons' literature-based connections allow teachers to "build in" rather than "add on" social-emotional learning (SEL) throughout the day. Field-tested in classrooms across the United States, these activities when fully implemented have resulted in improved school climate, greater parent engagement, increased academic achievement, and reduction in discipline referrals.

Beyond Texting: The Fine Art of Face-to-Face Communication for Teenagers. Fine. Debra, (2014).
Find it on Amazon.com
Beyond Texting presents communication tools and conversation skills to boost confidence, survive AND thrive. This book describes how to develop the ability to have a 3-D conversation while gaining interpersonal communication skills. Grades 7-11 This how-to-communicate guidebook offers young readers active tips for putting forward their best selves clearly and accessibly in all manner of social situations. From basics such as breaking the ice, keeping a conversation humming, and speaking with adults to more advanced topics making romantic connections, handling confrontation, dealing with cyber bullying, and integrating digital and in-person interactions, this slim volume offers a wealth of information.

CASEL: Core SEL Competencies
https://casel.org/core-competencies/
Social and emotional learning (SEL) enhances students’ capacity to integrate skills, attitudes, and behaviors to deal effectively and ethically with daily tasks and challenges. Like many similar frameworks, CASEL’s integrated framework promotes intrapersonal, interpersonal, and cognitive competence. There are five core competencies that can be taught in many ways across many settings. Many educators and researchers are also exploring how best to assess these competencies.

Common Sense Education: Social Emotional Learning
https://www.commonsense.org/education/toolkit/social-emotional-learning
This website has a toolkit for educators to support students' social and emotional learning skills. Common Sense is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in the 21st century.

My Mouth is a Volcano. Cook, Julia, (2006).
Find it on Amazon.com
My Mouth Is A Volcano is a picture book that takes an empathetic approach to the habit of interrupting and teaches children a witty technique to capture their rambunctious thoughts and words for expression at an appropriate time. This story provides parents, teachers, and counselors with an entertaining way to teach children the value of respecting others by listening and waiting for their turn to speak. (Ages 5-8)

Second Step SEL Curriculum
http://www.secondstep.org/
Second Step is a program rooted in social-emotional learning (SEL) that helps transform schools into supportive, successful learning environments uniquely equipped to encourage children to thrive. More than just a classroom curriculum, Second Step’s holistic approach helps create a more empathetic society by providing education professionals, families, and the larger community with tools to enable them to take an active role in the social-emotional growth and safety of today’s children. It’s a difference you can feel the moment you step through the doors to a Second Step school: a sense of safety and respect grounded in the social-emotional health and well-being of the entire school community.

Social and Emotional Learning in Middle School: Essential Lessons for Student Success: Engaging Lessons, Strategies, and Tips That Help Students Navigate Middle School and Focus on Academics, by Tom Conklin (2014)
Find it on Amazon.com
In an era of Common Core State Standards and accountability, students need to use the time they spend in school focused on academics and ready to learn. However, middle school has always presented special challenges. This is a time when students can spend a lot of time grappling with physical changes, forging interpersonal relationships, managing increased responsibility, and more—all of which can distract them from the primary purpose of school. The researched-based lessons in this book will help teachers delve into key social and emotional learning topics.

Social Skills for Kids: Over 75 Fun Games & Activities for Building Better Relationships, Problem Solving & Improving Communication, by Janine Halloran (2018)
Find it on Amazon.com
The author shares the best play experiences for kids to learn and practice social skills in real places and situations. This rich resource includes reproducible, step-by-step plans for how to play, alternatives to each activity, and debriefing questions to reinforce learning.

Teaching Social Skills to Youth, 3rd Ed.: An Easy-To-Follow Guide to Teaching 183 Basic to Complex Life Skills; by Jeff Tierney M.Ed. (2016)
Find it on Amazon.com
An Easy-to-Follow Guide to Teaching 183 Basic to Complex Life Skills Teaching Social Skills to Youth is Boys Town s trademark manual, offering the step-by-step component behaviors to 183 skills. The skills range from basic to complex and have been updated to reflect the challenges today s youth face. This third edition still includes hallmark treatment examples, demonstrating how and when to teach the skills. But new insights and information, based on the latest research findings, have been added. Also added are details about multi tiered approaches to social and emotional learning, and how skills relate to executive function. The appendices highlight what skills to include when you want to focus on social and emotional competency, executive function processes, behavior problems and problem situations. An enclosed CD offers printable posters for each skill.

The Inclusive Class: 10 Ways to Teach Social Skills in Your Classroom
http://www.theinclusiveclass.com/2015/08/10-ways-to-teach-social-skills-in-your.html
Teach social skills in your classroom by modeling manners. If you expect your students to learn and display good social skills, then you need to lead by example.

BADGE EARNERS

Amy Baird
Amy Baird
Heather Gray
Heather Gray
Daron Kennett
Daron Kennett

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