Processing Information

Processing Information

0.25 USBE Credits
This badge represents the effective use of cooperative learning structures or strategies that support learners in processing information. This includes learners interacting, talking about, making sense of, understanding, or reviewing information that has been presented.

DESCRIPTION

To earn this 0.25 credit badge you will submit one type of evidence from the list below to demonstrate your successful implementation of information processing strategies and structures. You will also complete a short written or video reflective analysis. Click Earn This Badge to learn more!

FEES

You will be charged $20 by the badge provider. You'll be charged at the point you submit your badge for final review.

CLARIFICATIONS

This badge represents much more than simply requiring students to do "group work" or sitting at tables. This badge focuses on educators' effective and and consistent use of strategies and structures that build trust, interdependence, and learner success.

IMPORTANT TERMS

Cooperative learning: students working together to accomplish shared learning goals with each student achieving their learning goal if and only if the other group members achieve theirs

Positive interdependence: individual achievement of goals if and only if the other group members achieve theirs

Individual accountability: each member is accountable for their own achievement and contribution

Structures: Kagan-designed learning experiences that maximize student interaction with each other and academic content; can be seen as a strategy

BACKGROUND SCENARIO

In a high school chemistry class, Ms. Ali wants each student to have opportunities to process their learning by hearing their own learning aloud. At the end of a lesson she explains that to make sense and reason through their understandings they are going to participate in a Processing Information structure called Three-Step Interview. Ms. Ali provides the essential question for their learning outcome for the day. She then asks students to write a response of their sense-making and understandings. After a sufficient amount of time, students are asked to find a partner (not from their team) to conduct an interview. Student A interviews Student B by asking the essential question and follow-up questions like, "How do you know?", "Explain yourself.", "Please clarify your thinking to me." Then the partners switch roles, Student B interviews Student A. This process allows for each student to hear their own thinking and compare and contrast it to the thinking and sense-making of another student.

EVIDENCE OPTIONS

Video: Submit a 5 - 10 minute video of your instruction demonstrating how you effectively organize students into groups with a clear and purposeful outcome of processing information through a cooperative learning structure.

Lesson Plan: Submit a lesson plan that you have used in your instruction. This lesson plan should demonstrate how you use cooperative learning structures with a clear and purposeful outcome of students interacting, talking about, making sense of, understanding, and/or reviewing information that has been presented.

Survey Results: Submit a survey that you administered to your learners, including the survey questions and data. The survey results should demonstrate your effective and consistent use of information-processing cooperative learning structures in your practice. The survey should also prompt learners to describe what parts of your instruction are successful in helping them acquire new facts and information.

Testimonial: Provide 3-5 learner testimonials in which they describe your cooperative learning expectations and their experience using highly structured strategies to process information, including interacting, talking about, making sense of, understanding, and/or reviewing information. These testimonials should include discussion of how working in a cooperative learning group supported their learning, and should demonstrate your effective and consistent use of knowledge-building cooperative learning structures.

Candidate's Choice: Submit another type of evidence to demonstrate your effective and consistent use of information-processing cooperative learning structures.


Review Criteria

Criterion 1: The evidence demonstrates effective and efficient management and purposeful use of a highly structured cooperative learning structure or strategy to help students to interact, talk about, make sense of, understand, and/or review information that has been presented.

Criterion 2: The evidence demonstrates that the cooperative learning activity uses a structure to ensure positive interdependence, individual accountability, equal participation, and simultaneous interaction to help students achieve their learning goal of interacting, talking about, making sense of, understanding, and/or reviewing information that has been presented.

REFLECTION PROMPTS

  1. Discuss the information processing structures you use consistently as a part of your practice, and how you use cooperative learning structures to facilitate learners interacting, talking about, making sense of, understanding, and/or reviewing information that has been presented.

  2. Explain how learners benefit from your use of information processing cooperative learning structures.

  3. Describe how you plan to strengthen or adapt your use of information processing cooperative learning structures in the future.

Review Criteria

Criterion 1: The educator reflects on the planning of type of processing information cooperative learning structure/strategy.

Criterion 2: The educator reflects on the processing information cooperative learning structure/strategy and how it helps students with interacting, talking about, making sense of, understanding, and/or reviewing information that has been presented.

Criterion 3: The educator reflects on the effectiveness and efficiency of the processing information cooperative learning structure/strategy and how to improve the implementation for the future.

RESOURCES

60 Kagan Structures: More proven engagement strategies--by Dr. Spencer Kagan, Miguel Kagan, & Laurie Kagen
Find it on Amazon.com
This book is the second in the Kagan series of cooperative learning structures. It describes It describes the rationale, research, and effective use and design of cooperative learning structures. It also is a resource to offer over 60 structures and provides the purpose and reasoning for when and why each structure could be used.

Arizona University: Cooperative Learning
https://cals.arizona.edu/classes/aed460/cooperative_learning_techniques.htm
This website has a descriptive list of a variety of processing information techniques.

Cal State: Cooperative Learning
https://web.calstatela.edu/faculty/jshindl/cm/cooplearning.htm
This website contains a planning guide to facilitate cooperative learning structures/strategies to ensure processing information.

Cooperative Learning: Office of Research Education Consumer Guide
https://www2.ed.gov/pubs/OR/ConsumerGuides/cooplear.html
This resource is a brief overview of what cooperative learning is and why it is used. It provides the research behind cooperative learning. Additionally, it provides outside resource contacts to get more information.

Information Processing: Round Robin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Armo8_pNH_g
This video explains how to use one processing information structure: Round Robin

Kagan Cooperative Learning--by Dr. Spencer Kagan & Miguel Kagan
Find it on Amazon.com
This book is the foundation for cooperative learning structures. It describes the rationale, research, and effective use and design of cooperative learning structures. It also is a resource to offer over 59 structures and provides the purpose and reasoning for when and why each structure could be used. Chapter 9 speaks specifically to class-building. Additionally, it provides more information on how to implement more classic styles of cooperative learning strategies that were not designed by the authors.

Making Cooperative Learning Powerful--Robert Slavin
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct14/vol72/num02/Making-Cooperative-Learning-Powerful.aspx
This article, written by a seminal researcher of cooperative learning, describes the steps of implementation towards effective and efficient cooperative learning. This resource helps educators design cooperative learning activities to ensure positive interdependence, individual accountability, equal participation, and simultaneous participation.

Starting Point: Cooperative Learning
https://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/cooperative/index.html
This resource provides the what, why, how, and techniques of cooperative learning. Additionally, it provides testimonials and videos of cooperative learning. Everything in this website is easily organized and provides additional resources for more study.

Starting Point: Group Processing
https://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/cooperative/group-processing.html
This website provides structures and strategies to facilitate group information processing.

BADGE EARNERS

Nathalie Ambruster
Nathalie Ambruster
Teresa Brinkman
Teresa Brinkman
Donna Wagner
Donna Wagner

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