Student to Student Feedback

Student to Student Feedback

0.50 USBE Credits
This microcredential represents the educator's practice in supporting student to student feedback. Beneficial peer feedback includes: reviewing data, providing constructive comments on student work, and self-reflection. Student to student feedback involves both students being able to accurately assess their peers' work as well as their own and determining next steps that are needed to achieve learning objectives.


DESCRIPTION

To earn this 0.5 credit microcredential you will submit two different types of evidence from the list below to demonstrate your proficiency in supporting student to student feedback. You will also complete a short written or video reflective analysis. Click Earn This Microcredential to learn more!

FEES

You will be charged $25 by the badge provider. You'll be charged at the point you submit your badge for final review.

CLARIFICATIONS

Feedback is more than a student knowing they did something correctly or incorrectly.
• Learning WHY something was correct or skillfully done, or WHY something was misunderstood or poorly executed.
• Students give one another feedback to understand their peer’s and their own learning, to help solidify their understanding, and demonstrate proficiency.
• Both students are able to modify their work to meet success criteria.
• Student to student collaboration and feedback is evident, spontaneous, and meaningful to the assignment given.
• Students are invested in the peer feedback task and understand the process of learning through collaboration.

The teacher’s role in student to student feedback is modeling and establishing routines, procedures, and expectations that provide opportunities for meaningful academic growth between students. Teachers' ability to create and maintain a safe and supportive environment is also crucial for effective student to student feedback.

The following are non-examples of student to student feedback
• Teacher says, “Do a Think-Pair-Share.”
• Working with a partner on an assignment/project.
• Sitting by a peer.

IMPORTANT TERMS

Feedback: Specific, meaningful information about reactions to a task or assignment which is used as a basis for improvement.

Meaningful: Creating relevant learning tasks with quality and purpose for increased student engagement.

Spontaneous: Students having an open, natural, and uninhibited exchange of feedback.

Learning Intentions: a statement, created by the teacher, that describes clearly what the teacher wants the students to know, understand, and be able to do as a result of learning and teaching activities. Clear learning intentions should help students focus not just on the task or activity taking place but on what they are learning.

Success Criteria: are linked to learning intentions. They are developed by the teacher and/or the student and describe what success looks like. They help the teacher and student to make judgments about the quality of student learning.

BACKGROUND SCENARIO

Your students have been working on a project individually. You then give time for students to assess each other's work. Many students are not keen on the idea of peer review. After all, who wants their peers to read their work and assess it? After several complaints about partnership assignments, sharing their work, and confusion about how to give feedback, you review the parameters and the students reluctantly begin their task. As the class begins the task, you observe some students sitting with blank stares who don't write anything on their classmate's paper. Others make minimal corrections or say the work is awesome and give it back to their peer. As students examine their individual papers with peer edits, they don't know what to do. Many students turn the paper directly in to the teacher or ask the teacher what to do next. After the task has been completed, you examine student work and note none of the work has improved or changed as hoped. You ask yourself: "Where did I go off the rails?" "How can I help my students give effective feedback to other students?" "How can I engage student to student feedback effectively?"
Next, imagine your students have been working on a project. You diligently assessed how you would partner students so that optimal peer to peer feedback would occur. You set expectations from the start of the lesson that peer review is not about judging each other’s work but helping each other learn. Also, you remind students that it’s important for the peer feedback space to be safe, judgement-free in order for everyone to truly benefit from the feedback. You consider the following guidelines:
• You have students focus on the positive aspects of the work before pointing out areas of improvement.
• You show students how they can phrase things constructively. Instead of “I don’t understand the point of your introduction,” try this: “Your thesis statement can be stronger. Can you provide examples?”
• You provide students with categories/areas to focus on when giving feedback, for example: Grammar, structure, sentences, creativity, etc.

EVIDENCE OPTIONS

Video: Record and submit a 5 to 10-minute video of your instruction demonstrating how you teach and support student to student feedback. This should include at least two of the following: structure and opportunity for student self-assessment; reflection on learning intentions and success criteria; goal-setting and planning to close the gap between current and target performance.

Student Work: Submit 3 samples of learner work for which student to student feedback was generated and acted upon. Include work from both before and afterwards, as well as the actual feedback, to demonstrate the effect of the student to student feedback.

Lesson Plan: Submit 2 detailed lesson plans demonstrating your use of student to student feedback to support learning. Each lesson plan should include at least 2 of the following: structure and opportunity for student to student feedback; use of learning intentions and success criteria; goal-setting and planning to close the gap between current and target performance.

Unit Plan: Submit an outline of a unit plan demonstrating your systematic use of student to student feedback to support learning. The unit plan should include the following: structure and opportunity for student to student feedback; use of learning intentions and success criteria; goal-setting and planning to close the gap between current and target performance.

Student Performance Data: Submit data demonstrating how learners’ performance improved as a result of student to student feedback. Data should include pre and post scores for three different assignments. Include a written description of the data and explanation of how learner growth was linked to your use of student to student feedback.

Survey Results: Create and administer a qualitative survey to your students about your use of student to student feedback in your instruction. Results should indicate consistent and effective student to student feedback and an atmosphere of trust and safety. Submit a survey report with the survey items (questions) and data.

Testimonial: Submit three testimonials from students that demonstrate how your instruction of skills for student to student feedback supports their learning.

Observation Results: Submit one observation from a colleague or administrator demonstrating your use of student to student feedback in your instruction and its results for learners. The results may be submitted as a written anecdotal record.

Candidate's Choice: Submit another type of evidence that does not appear elsewhere on this list. The evidence should demonstrate your use of student to student feedback to support learners.

Candidates are required to make 2 evidence submission(s).

Review Criteria

Student to Student Feedback: Evidence Criterion 1: Evidence demonstrates the educator consistently supports and provides opportunities for student to student feedback.

Criterion 2: Evidence demonstrates the educator effectively teaches skills for student to student feedback.

REFLECTION PROMPTS

  1. Describe how you teach and support student to student feedback.

  2. Explain how your support of student to student feedback enhances learning.

  3. Reflect on an aspect of your current practice with student to student feedback that could be made even stronger. What steps will you take, and what resources or supports will you need to access?

Review Criteria

Student to Student Feedback: Reflection Criterion 1: The reflection the process of student to student feedback.

Criterion 2: The reflection explains how student to student feedback enhances learning.

Criterion 3: The reflection demonstrates a commitment to professional growth and improvement.

RESOURCES

Austin's Butterfly (6:29
https://youtu.be/hqh1MRWZjms
In this video, Ron Berger models how to critique and provide feedback on the story of Austin’s Butterfly. It is a powerful message that promotes “Growth Mindset.”

Effective Feedback Animation, AITSL (3:23)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjCzbSLyIwI
An overview of what effective feedback looks like in a classroom setting.

Growing from Peer Feedback, Teaching Channel (12:39)
https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/growth-mindset-young-students
Marion Ivey shows how to include a growth mindset as student engage in student to student feedback.

I Noticed & I Wondered, Teaching Channel (3:01)
https://www.teachingchannel.org/video/student-to-student-feedback-nea
In this video Ms. Chism teaches her class how to give student to student feedback by using the sentence stems "I noticed" and "I wondered." She models how to have a group conversation using received feedback.

Learning Through Feedback, AITSL (3:42)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOeF7FTYlIo
This video is an example of how to model giving student to student feedback as a group before letting students do it on their own.

Peer Feedback in the Classroom (ASCD.org
http://inservice.ascd.org/teach-kids-to-give-peer-feedback/
This is an article about how to teach students how to give peer feedback.

Peer Feedback in the Classroom: Empowering Students to be the Experts, Starr Sackstein
Find it on Amazon.com
In Peer Feedback in the Classroom, National Board-Certified Teacher Starr Sackstein explores the powerful role peer feedback can play in learning and teaching. Peer feedback gives students control over their learning, increases their engagement and self-awareness as learners, and frees up the teacher to provide targeted support where it's needed.

Simple Peer Feedback, Katie Cranfill (1:34)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FLxh0sV8ZQ
This video teaches how to use the TAG formula in giving student to student feedback.

BADGE EARNERS

Justin Andersen
Justin Andersen
Karly Black
Karly Black
Nancy Glauser
Nancy Glauser
Daron Kennett
Daron Kennett
Deborah Kroeger
Deborah Kroeger
Alicia Madsen
Alicia Madsen
Laura Malan
Laura Malan
Shelbi Nelson
Shelbi Nelson

COMMENTS



Comment By Timestamp  

No records have been added yet.


© copyright 2017 Utah State Board of Education