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Phenomenon-Based Teaching and Learning
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Microcredential ID : 3012
Stack
Secondary Science Endorsement: Three-Dimensional Science and Engineering
Credits
0.5 USBE Credit

Description

This microcredential represents educators' use of natural phenomena and problems as a part of science and engineering instruction to guide student-centered learning. This stack of microcredentials fulfills one of the requirements of the pathway for the Secondary Science Endorsement.

Standards
  • Utah Effective Teaching Standards > Standard 1: Learners and Learning
    Element 3: Respecting Learner Backgrounds and - Demonstrating respect for each learner and exhibiting actions consistent with recognizing learners’ diverse backgrounds and perspectives as assets to the classroom community.
  • Utah Effective Teaching Standards > Standard 2: Instructional Design Clarity
    Element 3: Instructional Planning - Planning high quality, personalized instructional activities that are informed by student progress data, provide multiple opportunities for students to reflect upon and assess their own growth and allow multiple opportunities and means for demonstration of competency.
  • Utah Effective Teaching Standards > Standard 3: Instructional Practice
    Element 1: Instructional Strategies - Using appropriate academic language and evidence-based strategies to stimulate higher-level thinking, discourse and problem solving and to scaffold learning experiences to meet the needs of all students.
  • Utah Effective Teaching Standards > Standard 3: Instructional Practice
    Element 3: Relevance - Providing relevant learning opportunities that value students’ interests and backgrounds and allow learner agency and choice in accessing learning and demonstrating competency.
How To Earn This Microcredential

To earn this microcredential you will collect and submit two sets of evidence demonstrating your effective and consistent science and engineering instruction using natural phenomena and problems. You will also complete a written or video reflective analysis.

Be sure to follow the requirements in the earning criteria section of this microcredential. This is the rubric the reviewer will use to evaluate your work.

Fees
A fee of $20.00 will be assessed once the microcredential is submitted for review.
Clarifications

Phenomenon-based teaching and learning involves more than simply using a demonstration or interesting concept to engage students. Phenomena can be used to drive sensemaking as students engage in science and engineering practices to develop explanations for the phenomenon.

Important Terms
Anchoring phenomena :

A Big Idea phenomenon used to guide learning over multiple days/weeks.

Investigative phenomena :

Phenomenon used to guide an individual investigation. Used to help describe a part of an anchoring phenomena.

Analogous Phenomena :

Phenomenon used for assessment purposes. Not directly used as part of the learning process of a storyline.

Everyday phenomena :

Phenomenon personally experienced by students in their day-to-day routines outside of the classroom. May be used as an anchoring, investigative, or analogous phenomena.

Background Scenario / How This Will Help You

Research from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (National Research Council, 2012), states that “to develop a thorough understanding of scientific explanations of the world, students need sustained opportunities to work with and develop the underlying ideas and to appreciate those ideas’ interconnections over a period of years rather than weeks or months” (p. 26). This document also asserts that “The framework focuses on a limited set of core ideas in order to avoid the coverage of multiple disconnected topics—the oft-mentioned mile wide and inch deep. This focus allows for deep exploration of important concepts, as well as time for students to develop meaningful understanding” (p. 25). This places the focus on students using the other two dimensions of science instruction identified in The Framework (NRC, 2012), crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices, to deepen understanding of disciplinary core concepts.

The Framework (NRC, 2012) document is the foundational resource that informed the development of the current Utah Science with Engineering Education (SEEd) Standards (USBE, 2019). Within these standards, the concept of sensemaking of core ideas through crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices is a foundational principle of science education.

For teachers to include appropriate sensemaking experiences into instruction, they must also understand how to develop it in students. This microcredential stack focuses on teacher understanding and implementation of student sensemaking as a foundation for building effective science instruction in Grades 6-12. Each microcredential in the stack is meant to provide evidence of the competencies necessary to demonstrate effective three-dimensional science and engineering teaching.

Reference: National Research Council. (2012). A framework for K-12 science education: Practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Evidence Options
Be sure to submit the type and number of pieces of evidence specified below.
Category: Preparation and Planning

Submit the unit plan as described in this section to demonstrate your effective and consistent preparation and planning for phenomenon-based instruction.

Unit Plan:

Submit a unit lesson plan you have used as a part of your instruction that demonstrates effective integration of multiple phenomena into a unit in which phenomena are a central driving force of instruction. This unit lesson plan must include and clearly identify:

1) SEEd Standard(s) covered by the plan.

2) An anchoring phenomenon.

3) Additional phenomena integrated throughout the unit through supporting activities during which students develop a deeper understanding of the anchoring phenomenon.

4) Deliberate use of the SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs to explore phenomena throughout the unit.

5) Multiple formative assessments.

6) A summative assessment that asks students to apply all three dimensions to make sense of a scientific phenomena.

7) Rationale for the choice of all phenomena and their integration into the unit.

All phenomena used must be accessible (through interest, cultural relevance, local connections, or with appropriate scaffolding).

Category: Implementation

Submit the video as described in this section to demonstrate your effective and consistent implementation of appropriate practices for phenomenon-based instruction.

Video:

Submit a video of your instruction from the unit plan you submitted. Clearly identify when in your unit plan the video was filmed.

Your video may be up to 20 minutes in length and may consist of edited scenes of instruction with different groups of students. Your video must include the following:

1) Introduction of a phenomenon to the students.

2) Students engaging in the three dimensions to actively make sense of the phenomenon.

Be sure to follow your district/charter policies for student privacy.


Review Criteria

Criterion 1: Evidence demonstrates a robust understanding of how phenomena are best used to promote engagement in science learning across SEPs, CCCs, and DCIs.

Criterion 2: Evidence demonstrates the use of appropriate phenomena that build culturally relevant and accessible instruction for diverse learners and with diverse settings and applications.

Criterion 3: Evidence demonstrates a clear distinction and application of phenomena and design problems in proper contexts and realizes potential and application of various types of phenomena and their relation to one another and instructional cycles being used.

Criterion 4: Evidence demonstrates the use of a summative assessment that asks students to apply all of the three dimensions to make sense of a scientific phenomena.

Reflection Prompts

Reflect on the implementation of the submitted unit plan. How did the phenomena fit into broader 3D Science teaching and learning in your classroom?

Reflect upon the submitted video footage. Describe why you chose the phenomena and how it impacted your instruction. How did your use of this phenomenon effect student learning?

How does your planning and implementation of phenomenon-based teaching and learning focused on equity, ensuring that all students can access the learning?


Review Criteria

Criterion 1: The reflective analysis demonstrates the importance of phenomenon-based teaching and learning and its importance in the broader 3D framework.

Criterion 2: The reflective analysis demonstrates the impact that the use of phenomenon-based teaching and learning has on student sensemaking in the educator's classroom.

Criterion 3: The reflective analysis demonstrates planning and implementation of phenomenon-based teaching and learning to promote equity, ensuring that all students can access the learning.

Resources
A Framework for K-12 science education: Practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas
https://www.nap.edu/read/13165/chapter/1

A teacher friendly research document that explains the three dimensions of science including science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. Each dimension as well as their specific progressions from grades K to 12 is explained in depth within its own chapter. The disciplinary core ideas are grouped into major disciplines (i.e., Physical Sciences; Life Sciences; Earth and Space Sciences; Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science). Each discipline is explained in a separate chapter. The report also describes developmentally appropriate learning progressions. Additionally there are chapters on important topics such as integrating the three dimensions (Ch.9), Implementation into the classroom (Ch.10), Equity and Diversity (Ch.11).

National Research Council. (2012). A Framework for K-12 science education: Practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.


Ambitious Science Teaching
https://www.amazon.com/Ambitious-Science-Teaching-Mark-Windschitl/dp/1682531627/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1CZODIU33VJKI&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.PWRA1zEdvYqQpEYHILAFHd1Dof0GvPRdWmJHJeiDiLjYhuXGieTPIwfSlv3zFzf51vRjIH49GgiXUN_wBlUBW7JFps3_x8qYDpiBXG2HJwts47prZhw97-HpWKTOifWB

This book explores how to support student sensemaking of science concepts. It includes specific vignettes, examples, and practical suggestions for implementing in the classroom.

Windschitl, M., Thompson, J., & Braaten, M. (2018). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.


STEM Teaching Tool 28 - Qualities of a good anchor phenomenon for a coherent sequence of science lessons
https://stemteachingtools.org/assets/landscapes/STEM-Teaching-Tool-28-Qualities-of-Anchor-Phenomena.pdf

Instructional sequences are more coherent when students investigate compelling natural phenomena (in science) or work on meaningful design problems (in engineering) by engaging in the science and engineering practices. We refer to these phenomena and de


STEM Teaching Tool 42 - Using Phenomena in NGSS -Designed Lessons and Units
https://stemteachingtools.org/assets/landscapes/STEM-Teaching-Tool-42_Using_Phenomena_in_NGSS.pdf

Despite their centrality in science and engineering, phenomena have traditionally been a missing piece in science education, which too often has focused on teaching general knowledge that students can have difficulty applying to real world contexts.


STEM Teaching Tool 92 - Using Nature Journaling to identify meaningful local phenomena and support the infinite range of student sensemaking
https://stemteachingtools.org/assets/landscapes/STEM-Teaching-Tool-92-Nature-Journaling.pdf

Three-dimensional science learning centers on student sensemaking of phenomena. However, finding phenomena that are safe, accessible, culturally relevant, and grounded in the place where students live can be challenging for educators. Nature Journaling (NJ) can provide simple tools and strategies that educators can employ to encourage students’ investigations of local phenomena through deeper observations. In addition, helping students explore phenomena in local outdoor places leverages their interests and supports building relationships and awareness about community and neighborhoods.


Utah Science Education Tool #6: Student Sensemaking of a Phenomenon
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gpkLUN9A-jYh37MEefuWMaqZAAjBuqnhRWdX1lc6GZQ/edit

In a three-dimensional classroom, phenomenon drives instruction as students strive to make sense of what they observe using the science and engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.

Earners
Shauna Chapa

Shauna Chapa
Margaret Grindstaff

Margaret Grindstaff
Britt Rohde

Britt Rohde
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